A comparison of reactive strength index-modified between six U.S. Collegiate athletic teams.

Timothy J. Suchomel, Christopher J. Sole, Christopher A. Bailey, Jacob L. Grazer, George K. Beckham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in reactive strength index-modified (RSImod), jump height (JH), and time to takeoff (TTT) between 6 U.S. collegiate sport teams. One hundred six male and female Division I collegiate athletes performed unloaded (<1 kg) and loaded (20 kg) countermovement jumps as part of an ongoing athlete monitoring program. Reactive strength index-modified, JH, and TTT values for each team were compared using 1-way analysis of variance. Statistically significant differences in RSImod (p < 0.001), JH (p < 0.001), and TTT (p = 0.003) existed between teams during the unloaded jumping condition. Similarly, statistically significant differences in RSImod (p < 0.001), JH (p < 0.001), and TTT (p = 0.028) existed between teams during the loaded jumping condition. Men's soccer and baseball produced the greatest RSImod values during both the unloaded and loaded jumping conditions followed by women's volleyball, men's tennis, women's soccer, and women's tennis. The greatest JH during unloaded and loaded jumping conditions was produced by men's baseball followed by men's soccer, women's volleyball, men's tennis, women's soccer, and women's tennis. Men's soccer produced shorter TTT compared with men's baseball (12.7%) and women's soccer (13.3%) during the unloaded and loaded jumping conditions, respectively. Collegiate sport teams exhibit varying reactive strength characteristics during unloaded and loaded jumping conditions. Understanding the differences in RSImod between sports may help direct the creation of training and monitoring programs more effectively for various sports.
Original languageAmerican English
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume29
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • countermovement jump
  • athlete monitoring
  • stretch-shortening cycle
  • performance characteristics
  • team comparison

Disciplines

  • Psychology
  • Physical Therapy

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